"Paintings have a life of their own that derives from the painter's soul." Vincent Van Gogh

Sunday, September 22, 2019

A Dog and his Woman




14 x 18 / oil on linen 
An addition to my dog and human series.  And a close up view of the woman's face.



I have been thinking recently about remarkable moments in my art journey and one that stays with me occurred the first time I visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City as a young girl. I remember having a day all to myself and deciding to visit the museum. Spending a wonderful few hours there, I finally wandered into the European Art of the 19th Century section. Turning a corner heading from one room to the next, I was suddenly confronted by the larger than life Dead Christ with Angels by Edouard Manet. Perhaps it was the subject matter, or the intensely realistic depiction, or the play of light across the body with the face in shadow but, stopping in my tracks, I gasped at the horrible reality of what I was seeing combined with the incredible beauty of the painting. It was a shocking assault on my senses and one I have never forgotten. It was quite a moment - filling me with a rush of powerful emotion that stays with me even today. A piece of painted canvas transforming my whole experience and allowing me to appreciate a vision and a talent through my own senses. This is what great Art is all about.

Dead Christ with/Angels/ Metropolitan Museum of Art NYC/ 1864/ Edouard Manet

18 comments:

  1. Another wonderful person/ dog painting , great expression on the woman's face , and love her round figure :-) I admire how you always create life into your paintings .Manet is one of my favorite artists and this painting of his is a definite masterpiece!

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    1. Thanks so much, Jane - I have love trying to capture a moment in time depicting a special connection between the person and the dog. And the more I see of Manet's work, the more I admire him!

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  2. I love the dog/woman painting, she is a characterful lady!
    Wonderful how this painting made such an impact on you!

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  3. What a joy it is to study this woman walking her dog! I'm enjoying every part from her windblown hair to the matching ribbon and glasses. Manet's painting is beyond words. The way the light moves from the folds in the burial cloth at the bottom to the darker parts of the cave at Christ's head is mesmerizing. A masterpiece for sure!

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    1. So glad you noticed the windy day, Carol! And yes, I agree - this painting by Manet is a true masterpiece with the power to move and inspire. So wonderful.

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  4. I am in love with her Turquoise glasses! The way they are painted is masterful!
    Another thing I am really taken with is her posture. You nailed the motion of her talking to her dog enough to make me wonder what she is talking to him about. That is a little male I see - right? It is all so natural and harmonious.
    Thanks for sharing your experience at the Met. Your words...Shocking assault on your senses ...are powerful and I could envision it all so clearly. I am rather indifferent to that genre so have not seen this painting in anything but books, but I think he is a superb painter and because of you, I can see it with new eyes.

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    1. Those glasses are fun, aren't they?! Thank you for your wonderful comment - she is most likely a retired ballerina with a special connection to her little dog.
      Although the Impressionists and Post Impressionists are my favorites, the more I see Manet's work in person, the more I appreciate his genius. Not too long ago I saw The Railway at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. This painting shows a rather demure woman sitting on a bench while a young girl looks thru an iron fence toward the railyard. It was so beautiful and the brushwork so confident. It had me completely mesmerized.

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  5. Good morning Susan,

    Great art's sole function is to communicate. Manet's does... despite the years gone by or the subject matter. Pain and pathos merely heighten the beauty of this tomb subject.

    Strangely... or maybe not your "Dog With His Woman"... in all of its "cartoonish" simplicity implies a certain unspoken message to the viewer making one a participant.

    Both are paintings of "the moment." Thank you for sharing the moment with me. It speaks to my heart!

    Warmest regards... and Happy Fall!
    Bruce

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    1. Hi, Bruce, you are so kind and your words always provide me with a little boost on my painting endeavor. The power to communicate through paint and brushes is so very amazing - and I love it most when the viewer has a personal connection to the painting. As I have always felt - there is a little bit of magic going on across time and distance.

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  6. Your full-bodied women are the best, Susan... love this painting and love her dog... and this painting by Manet is SO powerful... I remember seeing this in the museum.

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    1. Hi, Hilda, it was such a powerful moment and what I remember most is the realization of just how deeply an artist can affect his viewer. And decades after the work was created, no less! It all seems like magic to me!

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    2. And happy Fall to you as well - I am loving the cooler temperatures and the trees beginning to show their autumn color.

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  7. Hi Susan! Love your story! Also similar experience when I was a youngster visiting Museum Fine Arts in Boston. Of course I love this piece! Love all your wonderful work! Remember me? Your art buddy Michael

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    1. H, Michael! I am so delighted to hear from you - I have missed you here in blogland. Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting. I remember when you saw my work in Boston - I'll never forget how wonderful that was! I hope you are doing and feeling well and painting up a storm!

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  8. Dag Susan, het is leuk hoe je de volslanke dames steeds weer elegant weet voor te stellen, ik voel me gerustgesteld.
    Groetjes van Simonne

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    1. Yes! She is casually elegant and is most likely one of my ballerinas - retired now from her dancing career! So happy you gives you comfort.

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  9. Bonjour ma chère Susan,

    Qui promène qui ? On sent le bonheur et la fierté de cette femme qui promène son toutou. Un beau chien. Elle doit lui murmurer des petits mots... ou peut-être le mettre en garde à la vue d'un autre chien !! qui sait ? Une oeuvre qui raconte une histoire et j'aime ça !
    Tu as l'art et la manière de mettre en scène des personnages "ordinaires". Ton pinceau leur attribue grâce, beauté, élégance. On ne peut que les aimer !

    Bravo chère amie !

    Gros bisous et bon week-end 🌸

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Your comments are welcome and brighten my day!